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HIST 460: History Research Seminar Course Guide: Finding Books

A course guide for students in HIST 460, the History Research Seminar

Finding Books on the Shelves

How do you find books on our shelves? Look for the location and the call number.

The location tells you where in the library the book is located. Some of the most common locations you'll see are:

  • Muskingum Stacks - The main book collection, located on the bottom and main floors.
  • Muskingum Juvenile Collection - Upstairs in the Pingledis Family Children's Library on the second floor

Call numbers tell you where the book is located, as well as what it's about. The Muskingum University Library uses Library of Congress call numbers.

  • A-E230 - Main floor in the Burlingame Room (on your right when you enter)
  • N - Main floor in the Gardener Center
  • E230 - H62.4 - Main floor in the Hutchinson Reference Center
  • H62.5-Z - Basement

Be sure to look at the books shelved around the one you want. They're shelved by subject, so you may find a great book that way.

Reading Call Numbers

Parts of a call number

Putting them in order

Finding Primary Sources

Published:

  • Add 'sources' to your keyword search in OhioLINK. The subject term for many primary documents uses the word 'sources'. You can also try words like 'letters', 'correspondance, ' 'personal narratives', 'diaries', 'papers', 'journals' or 'oral history'.

Online:

  • Many museums, libraries, universities and other organizations are digitizing primary sources for scholarly use. Try a google search using 'primary sources' as one of your keywords, or other words such as letters, etc.
  • For best results, limit your search to sites hosted by educational institutions (.edu) or the government (.gov). Do this by using Google's advanced search, or just add 'site:.edu' or 'site:.gov' to your search.
  • Be careful with online sources - check their 'about us' page to see who they are. Look for citations of the original source.